Lecturing the Later Revolutions

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These Lectures are Revolting…

Lecturing The French Revolution

The French Revolution is a common topic for university European History courses & some of the lectures on this are available on-line. Below are two examples.

Chronicle of the French Revolution: class compossed chronology

The A2 History class collectively made this Chronology of events in French History c 1770 – c 1830.  This chronology was built out of their study of other chronologies of the period and reflects what they considered to be significant from the material they had to study.  What is most fascinating is the recurrence of certain events in the chronology which suggest that they were considered important by more than one source chronology & by more than one student.

 

The Chronicle of The French Revolution

Chronology is a part of the foundation for the study of anything in history.  Developing a sense of the chronological frameworks involved in any topic & coming to understand how contested those frameworks are is more than half the battle.

Chronologies for the study of France in Revolutionary, Napoleonic, & Restoration times:

http://www.port.ac.uk/special/france1815to2003/

]http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/searchfr.php?function=find&start=1

http://library.brown.edu/haitihistory/index.html

http://www.pbs.org/marieantoinette/timeline/index.html

Imaging the French Revolution

This website provides detailed examinations of some of the images the French Revolution produced well worth reading through.  Thinking with images is a useful way to approach history as it gets us round the textual dependence we are usually faced with.

The Recent Historiography of the French Revolution

  In short, and with a few notable exceptions, the French Revolution has become about politics conceived primarily in terms of the 600–1,000 men who served at any one time in the national political body.

The French Revolution: The Short Version

The French Revolution began in 1789 with the meeting of the States General in May. On July 14 of that same year, the Bastille was stormed: in October, Louis XVI and the Royal Family were removed from Versailles to Paris. The King attempted, unsuccessfully, to flee Paris for Varennes in June 1791. A Legislative Assembly sat from October 1791 until September 1792, when, in the face of the advance of the allied armies of Austria, Holland, Prussia, and Sardinia, it was replaced by the National Convention, which proclaimed the Republic. The King was brought to trial in December of 1792, and executed on January 21, 1793. In January of 1793 the revolutionary government declared war on Britain, a war for world dominion which had been carried on, with short intermissions, since the beginning of the reign of William and Mary, and which would continue for another twenty-two years.

 

Thomas Carlyle on the People of Revolutionary France

In his The French Revolution (Vol 1) Thomas Carlyle writes:

If Voltaire once, in splenetic humour, asked his countrymen: ‘But you, Guakhes, what have you invented?’ they can now answer: The Art of Insurrection. It was an art needed in these last singular times: an art for which the French nature, so full of vehemence, so free from depth, was perhaps of all others the fittest.

Accordingly, to what a height, one may well say of perfection, has this branch of human industry been carried by France, within the last half-century! Insurrection, which Lafayette thought might be ‘the most sacred of duties,’ ranks now, for the French people, among the duties which they can perform. Other mobs are dull masses; which roll onwards with a dull fierce heat, but emit no light-flashes of genius as they go. The Frenchmob, again, is among the liveliest phenomena of our world. So rapid, audacious; so clearsighted, inventive, prompt to seize the moment; instinct with life to its finger-ends! That talent, were there no other, of spontaneously standing in queue, distinguishes, as we said, the French People from all Peoples, ancient and modern.

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