Two BBC radio programmes on Strikes & Squatting

Two BBC radio programmes of these week are of direct interest to us.

First an episode of Things we Forgot to Remmeber on the Police Strikes of 1918-19.

Second a, very personal, but still extremely interesting introduction to the history of squatting.

 

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History Workshop: Bollywood & Indian Nationalism

This fantastic post from Madhu Singh on History Workshop Online brilliant deals with a less well remembered act of resistance to British Imperial hegemony in Indian (well Bengal/ Bangladesh) and the use of the memory of this event in contemporary culture.

History Workshop: Protest & Riot

The on-line presence of History Workshop provides a great wealth of material for social & socially minded historians and two of its more recent postings are of direct concern to us.
First there is this essay on the social history of Kennington Common/ Kennington Park and the political struggle that the change in designation indicates. Second there is this essay on the history of London riots from the 1780s to today and what they may be taken to mean given the historical contexts involved. Both of which are excellent reads which point to the contested nature of space, names/labels, & events both at the time and in the history.

Battle of Cable Street 1936

On 4 October 1936, 1,900 supporters of Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists (BUF) attempted to march from the City of London through London’s East End only to find their way was blocked by a crowd of more than 100,000 anti-fascists at Gardiner’s Corner, the main route into east London.

Their grand scheme of 4th October failed. It met determined resistance not just from that community they had long been assaulting with words and, for many weeks, physically terrorising. The wider East End population, including many from the equally impoverished Irish community that Mosley tried to turn against the Jews, came out to stop the fascists too. A human wall blocked every entrance to the East End, especially at Gardiner’s Corner, Aldgate, and a series of barricades were built in Cable Street.

Cable St vimeo from Toby Trackman on Vimeo.

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