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Lecturing the Later Revolutions

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These Lectures are Revolting…

History Workshop: Protest & Riot

The on-line presence of History Workshop provides a great wealth of material for social & socially minded historians and two of its more recent postings are of direct concern to us.
First there is this essay on the social history of Kennington Common/ Kennington Park and the political struggle that the change in designation indicates. Second there is this essay on the history of London riots from the 1780s to today and what they may be taken to mean given the historical contexts involved. Both of which are excellent reads which point to the contested nature of space, names/labels, & events both at the time and in the history.

Lecturing The French Revolution

The French Revolution is a common topic for university European History courses & some of the lectures on this are available on-line. Below are two examples.

Chronicle of the French Revolution: class compossed chronology

The A2 History class collectively made this Chronology of events in French History c 1770 – c 1830.  This chronology was built out of their study of other chronologies of the period and reflects what they considered to be significant from the material they had to study.  What is most fascinating is the recurrence of certain events in the chronology which suggest that they were considered important by more than one source chronology & by more than one student.

 

Friedrich Engels on the English Bourgoisie (c.1844)

In his The Conditions of the Working Class in England Friedrich Engels writes:

I have never seen a class so deeply demoralised, so incurably debased by selfishness, so corroded within, so incapable of progress, as the English bourgeoisie; and I mean by this, especially the bourgeoisie proper, particularly the Liberal, Corn Law repealing bourgeoisie. For it nothing exists in this world, except for the sake of money, itself not excluded. It knows no bliss save that of rapid gain, no pain save that of losing gold. In the presence of this avarice and lust of gain, it is not possible for a single human sentiment or opinion to remain untainted. True, these English bourgeois are good husbands and family men, and have all sorts of other private virtues, and appear, in ordinary intercourse, as decent and respectable as all other bourgeois; even in business they are better to deal with than the Germans; they do not higgle and haggle so much as our own pettifogging merchants; but how does this help matters? Ultimately it is self-interest, and especially money gain, which alone determines them. I once went into Manchester with such a bourgeois, and spoke to him of the bad, unwholesome method of building, the frightful condition of the working-peoples quarters, and asserted that I had never seen so ill-built a city. The man listened quietly to the end, and said at the corner where we parted: “And yet there is a great deal of money made here, good morning, sir.”

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