Lecturing the Later Revolutions

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These Lectures are Revolting…

British India: an american lecture

Niall Ferguson: ‘the empire writes back’?

This spat in the LRB is not the normal mode of operations of academic debate (even the nastiest are conducted on far more serious terms than this).  The ferocity of Ferguson’s response, the accusatory tone, the immediate recourse to the threat of the English Libel courts, all of this points to the very sharp political edge to this debate.

[see this to make some sense of the title of this post]

Two BBC radio programmes on Strikes & Squatting

Two BBC radio programmes of these week are of direct interest to us.

First an episode of Things we Forgot to Remmeber on the Police Strikes of 1918-19.

Second a, very personal, but still extremely interesting introduction to the history of squatting.

 

Bibliographies: where to look

Finding sources of information that are pertinent, relevant, of the correct quality is not always easy and displaying the resources you have studied in your work requires a high degree of formality.  All of this comes under the heading of ‘bibliography’ as you would both consult & develop bibliographies as you go about the task of research.

So…

Where to find relevant material.

  1. Try to use google & its academic sub-division google scholar to search out material.  You will almost certainly have to then look in other places (such as libraries) for the actual material.
  2. The University of California Press makes a lot of material available on line here (but it takes some digging through).  There are other online resources for books such as The Online Book Page.
  3. Google Books might offer some relevant works.
  4. The BL offers a search engine for its 19th Century British newspaper collection that could be incredibly useful (requires registration and sometimes a fee).
  5. Jstor is the oldest & largest on-line repository of academic material and is free to search (but almost all material costs – often a lot).
  6. The IHR offers a lot of material including its Reviews in History on-line journal all of which could be very useful as is its guide to online resources.
  7. Open access repositories such as SAS Space may well offer very useful material.
  8. The online versions of major journals such as History Workshop Journal can provide very useful guides to resources (such as this one)

 

History Workshop: Bollywood & Indian Nationalism

This fantastic post from Madhu Singh on History Workshop Online brilliant deals with a less well remembered act of resistance to British Imperial hegemony in Indian (well Bengal/ Bangladesh) and the use of the memory of this event in contemporary culture.

History Workshop: Protest & Riot

The on-line presence of History Workshop provides a great wealth of material for social & socially minded historians and two of its more recent postings are of direct concern to us.
First there is this essay on the social history of Kennington Common/ Kennington Park and the political struggle that the change in designation indicates. Second there is this essay on the history of London riots from the 1780s to today and what they may be taken to mean given the historical contexts involved. Both of which are excellent reads which point to the contested nature of space, names/labels, & events both at the time and in the history.

Lecturing The French Revolution

The French Revolution is a common topic for university European History courses & some of the lectures on this are available on-line. Below are two examples.

Chronicle of the French Revolution: class compossed chronology

The A2 History class collectively made this Chronology of events in French History c 1770 – c 1830.  This chronology was built out of their study of other chronologies of the period and reflects what they considered to be significant from the material they had to study.  What is most fascinating is the recurrence of certain events in the chronology which suggest that they were considered important by more than one source chronology & by more than one student.

 

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